Aug 222012
 

Crime analyst admits that crime stats in the Hidalgo County Sheriff’s Office are manipulated:

How accurate are the statistics that the local law enforcement agencies send their states and ultimately to the federal government? PJM/PJTV has obtained exclusive hidden camera video from inside the Hidalgo County Sheriff’s Office. In this video, a crime analyst – the person responsible for entering official data into the Uniform Crime Reporting system from the Hidalgo County Sheriff’s Office – admits that the Hidalgo County Sheriff’s Office manipulates its crime statistics systematically.

UPDATED:

Pt. 2: Confessions of a Hidalgo County Sheriff’s Deputy

A brave whistle-blowing deputy says the effort to manipulate the county’s crime statistics starts at the top, with Sheriff Lupe Treviño

Part Three: The Downgrading of a Cross-Border Kidnapping and Murder

PJ Media’s Bryan Preston tells us the story of a cross-border murder that was downgraded to a welfare concern. Why are Hidalgo County sheriffs changing stats on brutal crime? How are taxpayers getting cheated with this unethical behavior?

Deputy: Hey what’s up? (unintelligible question)

Analyst: No, I can do it for you.

Deputy: Cool. (unintelligible, but he asks about changing a code)

Analyst: Huh?

Deputy: (unintelligible)

Analyst: I guess. Cause he’s the one changing everything.

Deputy: Changing the stats?

Analyst: (nods) He’s the one…

Deputy: Well how is he changing them?

Analyst: He reads the reports and fiddles with you if it’s not linking. Like, with a robbery, he redrizzles it down to a simple, like an, if it’s like uh, aggravated assault (looks away to see if anyone can hear), he orders a downgrade to assault. Or if…

Deputy: It’s real simple to do because most people are gonna, think you’re gonna have more.

(Analyst tilts head skeptically)

Deputy: You can justify it both ways.

Analyst: Yeah, but some of them, no. (crosstalk) Like, as far as the standards go, from the UCR, yeah.

Deputy: So. You can get in trouble.

Analyst: Hm?

Deputy: You can get in trouble?

Analyst: Not us, but…yeah the sheriff.

Deputy: Him (points in the direction of the sheriff’s office).

Analyst: Yeah. Not me.

Hidalgo County elected Democrat Guadalupe “Lupe” Treviño sheriff in 2004 and then re-elected him in 2008, and this spring he reportedly spent more than a half a million dollars to clinch the Democratic nomination for a third term as the county’s sheriff. In this heavily Democratic county, Treviño is a cinch to win that third term. The former Austin police officer claims that Hidalgo County has seen a dramatic reduction of violent crime during his tenure. Sheriff Treviño dismisses the presence and influence of drug cartels in his border county. To hear Sheriff Treviño talk, domestic violence may be a bigger issue in Hidalgo County. But as a local news story that was published August 10, 2012, shows, many residents of Hidalgo County do not feel safe and do not believe that crime is down at all. They also do not believe that Sheriff Treviño’s office is concerned about them.

The federal government has granted Hidalgo County about $6 million to fight crime since 2004. That money has gone to the county’s anti-narcotics efforts and has funded the purchase of sophisticated video surveillance towers that are supposed to be used to monitor the border and watch over troubled neighborhoods. One grant operation, called Stonegarden, has enabled the county to purchase several vehicles and video sky towers, which some residents allege have been used for non-police and even political purposes when they’re not being used to prevent crimes.

In May of 2011, President Obama went to the border at El Paso, Texas, and in his “alligators and moats” speech claimed the border is safe and mocked calls for more border security.


PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: Maybe they’ll say we need a moat. Or alligators in the moat.

They’ll never be satisfied. And I understand that. That’s politics.

But the truth is, the measures we’ve put in place are getting results. Over the past two and a half years, we’ve seized 31 percent more drugs, 75 percent more currency, and 64 percent more weapons than before. Even as we’ve stepped up patrols, apprehensions along the border have been cut by nearly 40 percent from two years ago – that means far fewer people are attempting to cross the border illegally

Also, despite a lot of breathless reports that have tagged places like El Paso as dangerous, violent crime in southwest border counties has dropped by a third. El Paso and other cities and towns along the border are consistently rated among the safest in the nation.

Full PJ investigation

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